wild foods (13)

Seaweed Nutrition

Big waves at beach yesterday, negative ion perfume in air. Gathered these bull kelp blades, which I dry, grind up, and sprinkle on omelette, meat, fish, potatoes, salads—just about anything. Homemade vitamin supplement, high in protein and minerals. I pickle the bull kelp bulbs. About to leave now for clamming and mussels. I have a 12′ Klamath aluminum boat, with 15 HP 2-stroke vintage Evinrude outboard motor, which I’m working the kinks out of.
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Hunting, Foraging, Gardening, Cooking Wild Foods - Hank Shaw via Kirk Lombard

I found this great website via Kirk Lombard, the Sea Forager:

HI THERE!

My name is Hank Shaw.

“I write. I cook. I fish, dig earth, forage, ferment things, brew beer, raise plants, live for food and chase God’s creatures. I drink Scotch or Bud, eat burgers or dine on caviar, depending on my mood or what day of the week it happens to be. I spend my days thinking about new ways to cook and eat anything that walks, flies, swims, crawls, skitters, jumps – or grows. This is my story.”

https://honest-food.net/

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For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of World War II

“The Lykovs lived in this hand-built log cabin, lit by a single window “the size of a backpack pocket” and warmed by a smoky wood-fired stove.” 

“As the intruders scrambled up the mountain, heading for the spot pinpointed by their pilots, they began to come across signs of human activity: a rough path, a staff, a log laid across a stream, and finally a small shed filled with birch-bark containers of cut-up dried potatoes. Then, Pismenskaya said:

Beside a stream there was a dwelling. Blackened by time and rain, the hut was piled up on all sides with taiga rubbish—bark, poles, planks. If it hadn’t been for a window the size of my backpack pocket, it would have been hard to believe that people lived there. But they did, no doubt about it…. Our arrival had been noticed, as we could see.

The low door creaked, and the figure of a very old man emerged into the light of day, straight out of a fairy tale. Barefoot. Wearing a patched and repatched shirt made of sacking. He wore trousers of the same material, also in patches, and had an uncombed beard. His hair was disheveled. He looked frightened and was very attentive…. We had to say something, so I began: ‘Greetings, grandfather! We’ve come to visit!’

The old man did not reply immediately…. Finally, we heard a soft, uncertain voice: ‘Well, since you have traveled this far, you might as well come in.’”

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/for-40-years-this-russian-family-was-cut-off-from-all-human-contact-unaware-of-world-war-ii-7354256/?utm_source=keywee-facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=keywee&kwp_0=277985&kwp_4=1099726&kwp_1=510127

From Rick Gordon

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Primitive Living Skills Gatherings Coming Up

Photographer Cliff Volpe sent us this info about Primitive Living Skills gatherings and some “stone age” projects Cliff may do next summer:

PRIMITIVE LIVING SKILLS GATHERINGS

These are week long events where instructors teach a variety of classes that focus on primitive technology, hunter-gather culture, and ancient ways. There are usually a very wide range of classes taught…from the more spiritual inclined to skills focused…such as primitive archery, atlatl manufacture, shelter building, wild edible plants, brain tanned buckskin, basket weaving, footwear/moccasins, felting, roadkill animal processing, diaper-less baby rearing, flint knapping, animal tracking, friction fire, primitive pottery, etc. Here’s a list of primitive living skills gatherings that happen on the west coast:

BUCKEYE GATHERING
https://buckeyegathering.net/

Summary: Held in May in California, about 500 people attend, I’ve never been but have heard great things about it. Registration filled up early last year.

Read More …

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Down A Country Lane

Last week I went for a run/walk on a trail that ran by a farm. Two women were standing gazing at the vibrant rows of spinach, lettuce, chard, and parsley. I said, “Nice, huh?” and one of them replied, “It’s just lovely.”

   The same evening I had a good harvest of cattail pollen. Going to mix it with freshly-ground oat flower to make bright yellow waffles, invite some lovers of native plants over for breakfast.

This is really a nice half-hour’s haul of pollen. You bend the heads over and shake them into a paper bag, then release and they spring back, unharmed. Miwok food.

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