vehicles (342)

Velomobiles

Dear Lloyd,

My name is Benjamin, I´m an English teacher from Bielefeld, Germany and an avid follower of your blogs.

Maybe you find this interesting for your blog as well: These guys from London / France build velomobiles from wood using techniques from the times when airplanes were made of wood.
Very skilled craftsmen with beautiful vehicles – I think these guys reserve much respect 🙂

This is NOT advertising – I´m just fascinated by these vehicles !!!!! 🙂

https://www.mosquito-velomobiles.com

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The 2,500-Mile Across-USA Expedition of Bernie Harberts and His Mule Polly

Hi Lloyd,

Last we spoke, I was telling you about the “Lost Sea Expedition”. It was just mule Polly and me traveling across the USA in our wagon. We were looking for stories behind the Lost Sea, the ancient seabed that once covered the Great Plains.

I filmed the journey without a film crew, support vehicle or sponsor. I charged my camera gear off the solar panel bolted to the wagon roof. Now, that footage has been turned in to the “Lost Sea Expedition” TV series.

First, a bit about the journey:

As I bumped across the USA in my wagon, I folks what they knew about the Lost Sea. Early on, a Lakota elder told me about “buffalo stones” – fossils from a marine creature called a baculite. From there, the story took off in all directions. I thought I was looking for a vanished sea. Instead, I unearthed an all-American web covering topics as far ranging as the Ogallala Aquifer, Creationism, Evolutionism, Prairie Fever ,and Depression-era horse breaking.

Who knew that diving in to the origins of a long vanished sea would turn in to a journey to the heart of America?

2,500-mile wagon route across America

I think I dove so deep in to the fabric of America because I went so small. I traveled in the manner of our ancestors, men in wagons with time and high hopes but not much money. I built the wagon myself. It was so tiny, I could heat it with a few candles and my mule Polly could pull it alone. It was big enough for my film gear, a few clothes and some food…just.

Photo: A visitor checks out the wagon. At just over 30 inches, it soon became clear why my friends referred to it as the MRI machine (or the porta-john).  Damn, I could barely roll over in that thing, a task that got tougher and tougher the higher I  piled the sleeping bags!


Out there rolling across the land, I learned that the smaller you travel, the more you expose yourself to the weather, the heat, the cold, the ups and downs and the people you meet along the way. Because my mule needed to eat and drink every day, I was limited in how far I could travel every day. On average, I went 8 to 10 miles before knocking off for the night.

That meant every day, wherever I was a few hours before dark, that’s where I spent the night. That also meant I knocked on a LOT of doors asking my well prepared line, “Hi I’m Bernie and this is my mule Polly. Do you have a place we could camp for the night?”

And that, that dependence on strangers met along the way, that documenting all weathers, animals and climes, is what gives the “Lost Sea Expedition” such incredible insight in to America.

Photo: The wagon had a tiny window at each end. The round one framed the scenery like a ship’s porthole.

I made the “Lost Sea Expedition” for all those people who dream of adventuring, running away, or just taking a break from life’s responsibilities. I made this series for all the folks I met on the road who said, “Man, I’d love to do what you’re doing but…” and then they’d give me reasons why they couldn’t break free. Hopefully, it will inspire others to finally break the bonds of what’s keeping them back.

Plenty more about the Lost Sea Expedition at lostseaexpedition.com.

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Vermont Bus for Disabled Adults

This is a bus at Zeno Mountain Farm in Lincoln, Vermont. The bus is used for a summer camp devoted to disabled adults. The camp has wheelchair accessible treehouse built by someone affiliated with Yestermorrow (Design/Build School in Waitesfield, Vermont)

Jon Kalish

Manhattan-based radio journalist Jon Kalish has reported for NPR since 1980. Newspaper articles, radio docs, podcasts & NPR stories at kalish.nyc.

twitter: kalishjon

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From Canada to Mexico by Mule

Bernie Harberts was featured in our book Tiny Homes (pp. 188-89). He traveled from Canada to Mexico for 14 months in a 21-square-foot (floor area) wagon pulled by a mule. Here is a letter we just received from him.


Howdy Lloyd,

Many mule miles, no letters…

You featured mule Polly and her wagon in your Tiny Homes- Simple Shelter book.

That story continues.

What I never really said much about is that I filmed that 14-month voyage across America. That voyage is now the “Lost Sea Expedition” TV series. The site and official trailer are at: https://lostseaexpedition.com

I’ve attached some photos for you. I’d love to share the story and news with your blog readers.

Hell, I know you’re busy. You write you could use a clone. No worries. I’ll write the content for you. Just tell me what would work for you (short article, picture essay, blog post, etc).

Hope you and the hummers are well. You and I have Lived for we know the Jubilation of a thawed hummer flying from our hands!

Keep groovin’

Bernie Harberts

https://lostseaexpedition.com

A Man A Mule America

Both photos from Tiny Homes: Simple Shelter
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Back in the USSR

Driving for 10 days on the wrong side of the road in Scotland was really stressful,  I think partly because I’ve been driving since age 14, over half a million miles of doing it one way. Ingrained habits…

I picked up a car in Edinburgh and was immediately terrified in the “roundabouts.” Cars pouring in from 4 directions, weaving in and out. “Give way to the cars on your right,” said Diana, and I used this as a mantra in the roundabouts. I ended up driving the last 2 days in a part of Scotland (near Irvine) that was peppered with roundabouts. Sheesh! I got better with experience, but it was still stressful..

The cabbie on the way to the airport navigated them smoothly, hardly slowed down.

It’s such a relief to be back the right (sic) side of the road.

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