vehicles (342)

The Motoped Survival Bike: "…baddass TreeHugger alternative to a car. "

“So why is this on TreeHugger? Well, The Motoped Survival is a motor-assisted bicycle that gets up to 160 miles to the gallon, and the 49CC motor will take it up to 500 miles on a three gallon fill-up. It has racks and tie-on points that can carry a lot of gear when it’s bug-out time, and it is a whole lot easier than pushing a shopping cart like Viggo had to do in The Road.

It’s not a horrible polluter like my old two-stroke Solex moped was; with its Smart Carb fuel system, the manufacturer claims that you can reduce your carbon footprint by as much as 70% compared to the usual small engine in recreational products. At 120 pounds it is a lot heavier than a regular bike, but you can still pedal it.…”

“…Or you could just go camping, or have the coolest looking moped in town. I know I am being totally TreeHugger incorrect here, but this is a thing of beauty, and looks quite practical. Yes, an electric bike is greener but there’s no range anxiety here. And at 160 MPG with low emissions, it’s a baddass TreeHugger alternative to a car. It’s also a thing of beauty at $2499.”

https://www.treehugger.com/bikes/i-so-want-motoped-survival-bike.html

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Lloyd’s Camping Vehicles, Part 3

In 1988 I bought a 4-cylinder, 5-speed Tacoma 4×4 with the Xtra cab (meaning a 6′ bed). Then in 2003, I got a new one, same model. The engine is a bit gutless going up long hills, but will run forever.

By this time I knew exactly what I wanted:

A metal camper shell made by Tradesman in Winters, Calif. It opened on all three sides, was way stronger than plastic shells. I bought an aluminum rack from Hauler Racks. It came disassembled via UPS and I bolted it together and mounted it. It rests on the truckbed sides, not on the camper roof.

At Campway’s in Santa Rosa, Calif., I got the inside of the bed sprayed with a waterproof membrane to protect the metal. Also a “carpet kit,” with storage boxes along the sides and sliding middle panels inside the bed.

You can see the pull-out drawer and side storage boxes. I shot this photo on Hornby Island, BC on one of my four trips to Canada shooting photos for Builders of the Pacific Coast. I remember one afternoon collecting oysters way out on a reef (beyond the commercial guys and cooking them for dinner on a beach fire with aluminum-foil-clad potatoes, red wine, AND just-picked blackberries with …(ahem)… heavy cream and brown sugar.

More on TheShelterBlog here.

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ELF Solar Powered Electric Vehicles From Organic Transit

“…The ELF is a solar and pedal hybrid vehicle powered by you and the sun. ‘The most efficient vehicle on the planet,’ it is a revolution in transportation and gets the equivalent of 1800 MPG.

Hand built in the USA, the ELF is legally a bicycle, so it can travel on bike paths, park on sidewalks and requires no gas, license, registration or insurance.

It can travel up to 20 mph on electric power only and up to 30 mph when combined with pedaling. It can hold more than a dozen bags of groceries and can handle an amazing 350 lb. payload.…”

Comprehensive review of Elf by Sami Grover in Treehugger here.


Above text from https://organictransit.com/

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Lloyd’s Camping Vehicles, Part 2

These days I’m doing less posts on this blog and more on TheShelterBlog. I realized that I had a lot of build-garden-homestead-forage experience (and assemblage) to communicate and liked the idea of putting it all in one place.

I’ll cross-reference some of my posts on the new blog with this one, such as this:

I bought it used from a builder friend. It didn’t have the “Xtra cab,” so the bed was 8′ long.
Tarp for Shade:  I had a Yakima Rocket Box on racks on the camper roof, with a flea market tarp (12’×14′) folded up inside. The frame was 1″ electrical conduit, with special connectors tightenable with wingscrews. The tarp was aluminized fabric. It was weighted down with canvas bags filled with sand and hung from each corner (ingenious!). Took maybe 45 minutes to set up. I’d place it butting up to the truck bed.
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