salvaged materials (93)

More on Tinker's Bubble, Off-Grid community in Somerset, England.

“…The name Tinkers Bubble comes from the spring that flows through the woodland ending in a small waterfall by the road. This is where gypsies brought their horses to water them at the bubble; the gypsy name for a waterfall.

The home pictured is Mary and Joe’s, a roundwood timber frame with lapped exterior walls and thatched roof and repurposed windows.…”

https://naturalhomes.org/tinkersbubble.htm

Sent by Anonymous

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Our Next Book - SMALL HOMES - Now In Production

I started 3 days ago. My M.O. is to open the file drawer and start picking out folders (there are 50-60 now) to work on.

I pick them out randomly and start doing layout— with scissors and removable scotch tape. No stinkin computers at this stage.

I print out the text in 3 & 4 columns, adjust photos to desired size on copy machine, and do rough layouts.

This is turning out to be really fun. We’ve accumulated material for maybe a year and now, the book is starting to assemble itself, in random manner. Organizing will come later.

Note: contact us if you know of small homes (400-1200 sq. ft.) that would work in this book:

smallhomes@shelterpub.com

We are especially interested in any kind of homes in cities and towns.

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Heritage Salvage in Petaluma

If you’re a Northern California builder, I highly recommend you stop in at Heritage Salvage in Petaluma. They have tons of used wood, hardwood slabs, and all manner of recycled and soulful building materials.

Shown here is a walnut slab that is 8′ 3″ long, and 60″ at one end and 43″ at the other. Think of the walnut tree that this came from.
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Update on Lucas Sweeten's Schoolbus Home

Lucas’ bus was featured on pp. 70-71 of Tiny Homes on the Move. Here’s the latest:

April 3, 2015

Hey Hey there Lloyd, I wanted to give you an update on the bus. Also, I really appreciated you working with me for the timeline and putting my bus in your book.… So, for the update: I’ll attach a few pictures of the bus. Naturally it’s not finished. It most likely will never be, but as we know that is the joy of a custom mobile life.

Since the past pictures I’ve rebuilt most of the interior using wood I’ve cut, milled, stacked and dried (all done a few years back), or wood that I’ve salvaged. There’s a 400 watt solar system, 12v lighting, converted freezer to fridge (not in the pics), deck on top, pull behind trailer/porch, and concrete shower. The floors are plumbed with radiant heat pex tubing.  I have a thermal solar panel although it’s not installed yet. The grey water tank is in, and finally some curtains are being hung.

In just a few weeks I’ll be taking her on the true maiden voyage. Granted I’ll be driving back to where it was about 6 months ago but, I’ll be living in it this time for the foreseeable future. It will be a short stay in Kentucky before heading to Maine, which is my final destination. In Maine I’ll be attending a metalwork school for the rest of the year followed by a fine furniture making school. Thanks again and I hope you enjoy.

    Lucas Sweeten

Read More …

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True Costs of Using Recycled Materials

From my Facebook Author page: (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lloyd-Kahn/110048295717073?v=wall)  Note, I don’t do Facebook actively; I just have my blog posts put up automatically. There’s just not enough time in my day to be a full Facebook participant.

Hey Lloyd Kahn, Thanks again for all your hard work, you inspire us! I have noticed a lot of articles in the tiny home archives over the years mentioning such statements as “Man builds tiny home for $500…” what about his total labor time, and those often overlooked overhead costs… do you find such a statement at all misleading? I am a licensed builder myself, running a company in Portland, OR and feel as tho I often have to re-educate clients as to what the “actual costs” of construction really are (mostly the cost of my Time.) This conversation inevitably arises when during design phase we discuss the option of reclaimed materials… which almost always ends up costing more $ (sourcing, milling, install.) Hooray for folks who are living their dreams building a place of their own with their “free time”, but let’s also paint a realistic picture by including the price of time, and thus value the craft appropriately. As a builder yourself, any of your thoughts would be appreciated.

-Kiel Kellow

Kiel, You’re absolutely right, the costs (as here) are way more than $500 if you consider labor. Time is precious.

-Lloyd

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