poetry (6)

Video of Wily Coyote on Road Last Night

https://www.instagram.com/p/BLv7ghJBxQv/?taken-by=lloyd.kahn

Fox was the only living man. There was no earth. The water was everywhere. “What shall I do,” Fox asked himself. He began to sing in order to find out.

   “I would like to meet somebody,” he sang to the sky.

   Then he met Coyote.

   “I thought I was going to meet someone,” Fox said.

   “Where are you going?” Coyote asked.

   “I’ve been wandering all over trying to find someone. I was worried there for a while.”

   “Well it’s better for two people to go together… that’s what they always say.”

   “O.K.. But what will we do?”

   “I don’t know.”

   “I got it! Let’s try to make the world.”

   “And how are we going to do that?” Coyote asked.

   “Sing!” said Fox.


   -Jaime de Angulo, Coyote Man & Old Doctor Loon

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Beware, White Man…

“Beware, white man, of playing with magic of the primitive. 

It may be strong medicine.

It may kill you.

Ye, sons and daughters, foster children of the cities, if ye would go to the wilderness in search of your Mother, be careful and circumspect, lest she lure you into her secret places, whence ye may not come back.”

-Jaime de Angulo, The Lariat

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Alphabet Insanity!

//www.youtube.com/embed/RvLmcRZte78

“…oozing out oodles of onomatopoeias…”

Sheesh!

This is a stunning complex poem.

From Evan Kahn


PS My Mom was born on Friday the 13th, and she said that it’s actually a happy day. A bit of research shows that it’s a western superstition that it’s unlucky, that other cultures consider it a lucky day.


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Mahalia & Martin & The Dream

“It was late in the day and hot, and after a long march and an afternoon of speeches about federal legislation, unemployment and racial and social justice, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. finally stepped to the lectern, in front of the Lincoln Memorial, to address the crowd of 250,000 gathered on the National Mall.

   He began slowly, with magisterial gravity, talking about what it was to be black in America in 1963 and the “shameful condition” of race relations a hundred years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Unlike many of the day’s previous speakers, he did not talk about particular bills before Congress or the marchers’ demands. Instead, he situated the civil rights movement within the broader landscape of history — time past, present and future — and within the timeless vistas of Scripture.

   Dr. King was about halfway through his prepared speech when Mahalia Jackson — who earlier that day had delivered a stirring rendition of the spiritual “I Been ’Buked and I Been Scorned” — shouted out to him from the speakers’ stand: “Tell ’em about the ‘Dream,’ Martin, tell ’em about the ‘Dream’!” She was referring to a riff he had delivered on earlier occasions, and Dr. King pushed the text of his remarks to the side and began an extraordinary improvisation on the dream theme that would become one of the most recognizable refrains in the world.…”

By Michiko Kakutani, New York Times August 27, 2013 here.

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