ocean (187)

Surfing During Paleolithic Times

“…Wanna see our pictures on the cover

Wanna buy five copies for our mothers

Wanna see my smilin face

On the cover of the Rollin Stone”

People of a certain, um, age will remember the song from the early ’70s by Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show.

Well, I finally made it on a cover, 61 (ulp!) years later in the just-out copy of The Surfer’s Journal. I was wearing a shorty wetsuit from the Dive ‘N Surf shop in La Jolla (pre-O’Neill). You sent them your measurements and they sent you the cut-out pieces and a bottle of Black Magic glue and some tape. You’d glue together pieces, glue tape over seams. Early wetsuits didn’t have nylon lining so you’d rub cornstarch on your body so as to be able to slip the suit on. Underneath it I was wearing on old-fashioned wool bathing suit. A 9’ Velzy balsa wood board (this was just before foam.)

This was about a 6-8′ drop to the water (at Steamer Lane), there was a ledge, and we did this when the tide was right in order to stay dry. We’d wait for a wave to hit the cliff, then jump as the backwash flowed outward.

Before wetsuits there wasn’t much of a crowd problem. I remember a foggy morning, 6-8′ at the Lane, 4 of us out. Ah, me.

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UK National Trust Seeking Ranger For Remote Island

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post “#shelterpublications world headquarters. #publishi…“:

Might interest one of your adventuring readers:

https://www.charitytoday.co.uk/national-trusts-new-farne-islands-ranger/

Could you be the National Trust’s new Farne Islands ranger?

Fed up with the rat race? With no running water and thousands of puffins as your only neighbours, a new National Trust vacancy promises the ultimate escape.

it’s a wildlife enthusiast’s dream – promising jaw-dropping sunrises, a one minute commute and one of England’s largest seal colonies on your doorstep.

This job isn’t the normal 9 to 5. Being good with PowerPoint isn’t a priority.

“We’re looking for someone with a passion for wildlife and conservation – and who wants to share that passion with others.

Applications for the position of ranger close on 7 February, 2017. To apply visit:

https://careers.nationaltrust.org.uk/OA_HTML/a/#/vacancy-detail/46353.

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Monterey Clipper with Christmas Lights

My brother Bob’s Monterey Schooner, docked in Tiburon, Calif.

Description of these boats on Wikipedia:

“The Monterey Clipper has long been considered part of the local fishing fleet to the San Francisco Bay Area, the Monterey Bay Area and east to the Sacramento delta. The original hull design was introduced into the area by Italians in the late 1860s. The design came from Genoese lateen-rigged sailboats, known as silenas, then later referred to as San Francisco feluccas.

The feluccas were at first used to gather shrimp in the SF bay, but when this fishery was abandoned to the Chinese, they gillnetted for local bay fish, trolled for ocean fish, and pulled up the famous Dungeness crabs. During this period, they made up about two-thirds of the 85 or so fishing boats that served the city. Later, as the fleet grew, about 50 boats serviced just the crab fisheries.By 1890, there were about 1000 feluccas in the wharf. Read More …

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"The Forgotten Victorian Craze for Collecting Seaweed"

Above: Selected plates from Margaret Gatty’s “British Sea-Weeds.” Biodiversity Heritage Library/public domain

“This woman…is one of… one of Victorian Britain’s many female seaweed hunters. Beloved by figures like Queen Victoria and George Eliot, seaweed-hunting became a popular way for women to tap into the enthusiasms of their era—and contribute to the burgeoning annals of science.…

…As the seashore itself gained a reputation as a restorative landscape, plenty of women found themselves there, either recuperating from illness or seeking family-friendly summer fun. Many of them were already diehard scrapbookers, and seaweed makes a particularly rewarding collage subject: not only does each specimen’s strange color and shape present a design challenge, its gelatinous inner structure means that, when pressed onto paper, it actually glues itself to the page.…”

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-forgotten-victorian-craze-for-collecting-seaweed

(Came upon this from following up on Kevin Kelly’s tip for using atlasobsura.com for finding “…obscure, very offbeat attractions…” to wherever he is traveling. https://kk.org/cooltools/)


If you’re not interested in seaweed, still check out https://www.atlasobscura.com.

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Eating Seaweed

Lately I’ve been collecting it, drying it, then cutting it up into thin strips with a knife (powdering it in a coffee grinder makes dust that I’m sure is bad to breathe), then putting it on pasta, in omelettes, oatmeal, anything that’s hot, as an infusion of the sea and homemade vitamin and mineral supplement.

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Red sky at night, sailor's delight. Red sky in morning, sailor's warning…

I finally looked it up.

Usually, weather moves from west to east. In the mid-latitudes, the prevailing winds are westerlies. This means storm systems generally move in from the West.…


Red sky at night, sailors delight When we see a red sky at night, this means that the setting sun is sending its light through a high concentration of dust particles. This usually indicates high pressure and stable air coming in from the west. Basically good weather will follow.

Red sky in morning, sailor’s warning A red sunrise can mean that a high pressure system (good weather) has already passed, thus indicating that a storm system (low pressure) may be moving to the east. A morning sky that is a deep, fiery red can indicate that there is high water content in the atmosphere. So, rain could be on its way.…

In the Bible, (Matthew XVI: 2-3,) Jesus said, ‘When in evening, ye say, it will be fair weather: For the sky is red. And in the morning, it will be foul weather today; for the sky is red and lowering.’”

https://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/weather-sailor.html

Another source: https://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2009/09/14/q-a-sailors-delight-fact-or-fi/

Photo from: https://simple-pleasures.org/2013/09/05/red-sky-orange-sky/

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