ocean (187)

Hawaiian Islands Part of Chain of Massive Volcanoes

This explains why there are so many dangerous places to swim in Hawaii — the steep drop-off of mountains into sea.

-From Ted Fleming

“The Hawaiian Islands are a chain of massive volcanoes that stretch over 1,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean. Though some of these volcanoes reach nearly 14,000 feet above sea level, more of their height lies under the ocean’s surface. For example, Mauna Kea (on big island of Hawaii — 13,796 ft above sea level) is about 32,000 feet from the mountain’s base to the summit.”

https://pacificislandparks.com/2012/02/18/below-the-surface/

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Short Hike on Na Pali Coast

This is a steep, rugged section of land at the end of the road on the north shore of Kauai. I hiked in 2 miles to Hanakapiai Beach and it was tough! This is a mother of a trail, steep and slippery in parts. When I got to the beach, the surf was (sorry to use the word) awesome. 15’+ shore break. Anyone in the water would be more or less instantly killed, if not by the bonecruncher waves, by the rocky (no sand this time of year) shore.

A few observations:

1. There were just too many people on the trail.

2. I couldn’t believe how many overweight people were making this trek.

3. There were also runners — running no less.

At left, part of the trail going up…


This day’s adventure to be continued…

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The Most Wonderful Day of My Life

I realize that I am afflicted with over-enthusiasm, especially when it comes to communicating my experiences as i move through life. That said, this was just about the most perfect day I’ve ever had.

I was a water person in earlier years, starting at 4 years of age when I fell in a lake and while underwater until my dad fished me out, enjoyed the experience. In high school I swam competitively and one day after a swimming meet at the great Fleishacker salt water pool out at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, a swimmer named Jim Fisher and I went out across the Great Highway to swim in the ocean. I couldn’t believe it. The waves, blue water, invigoration. I was hooked.

Had my first surfboard ride at age 18, then changed my major at Stanford so I was through every Thursday at noon and able to head to Santa Cruz until Sunday night. I was a lifeguard, taught swimming, and then somehow over  the years, drifted away from the beach in comparison with my serious surfer friends.

WELL — I’ve come to this small island of Kauai to get back in the water. Today I was in the ocean 3 times — a little bodysurfing, mostly swimming (the last time in the rain tonight) and in a fresh water pool 3 times..

A barista coffee shop on wheels with wonderful coffee, muffins, and vibes. A hostel on the beach with rates (in this expensive resort area — Kapaa –) of  $40/$80 per night for shared/solo rooms. A guy in the country with about 300 beautiful roosters and tangerine, grapefruit, macadamia and lychee nut trees.  A day of clouds and sun and clouds and rain. This island like a large boat in the Pacific Ocean. A Mexican restaurant that feels like you’re in Mexico with delicious food and 3 TVs with Mexican soccer games.

I’ll try to get around to writing it up (with photos) before long…

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Moon on Water and Crabs Underneath

Looking down on the ocean/beach last (dark) night. Moon was a crescent (blurred here), 3 days past new moon. Light on right is house on shore, the 3-4 lights on horizon are crab fishing boats. It’s looking like a good crab season. One local fisherman got 1200 pounds the 1st day out.

I sometimes imagine what the ocean floor would look like if I could see it without the water. There are hundreds of square miles covered with — CRABS! They’re just about everywhere out there.

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The Four-Masted Ship Pamir, 1905-1957

“’Pamir’ was originally launched in Hamburg in 1905, she had a steel hull, a tonnage of 3020 gross, an overall length of 375 feet, a beam of 46 feet and a loaded draught of 24 feet. Her three masts stood 168 feet above the deck and the main yard was 92 feet wide. She carried a total of 50,000 square feet of sails and could reach a top speed of 16 knots, while her speed on passage was often better than 10 knots.

Pamir, a four-masted barque, was one of the famous Flying P-Liner sailing ships of the German shipping company F. Laeisz. She was the last commercial sailing ship to round Cape Horn, in 1949. By 1957 she had been outmoded by modern bulk carriers and could not operate at a profit. Her shipping consortium’s inability to finance much-needed repairs or to recruit sufficient sail-trained officers caused severe technical difficulties. On 21 September 1957 she was caught in Hurricane Carrie and sank off the Azores, with only six survivors rescued after an extensive search.…”

Photo: https://i.imgur.com/GYNzpLS.jpg

Text: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pamir_(ship)

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