homesteading (252)

Sophie and Marc's Homestead of Recycled Materials in Quebec

I just got this email from Sophie and Marc, whose home is covered on pages 116-119 of Small Homes — after we sent them 2 books:

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Hey Lloyd,
thanks from my heart
I brought Small Homes to the video store in small town in Quebec.
what a hit!
Might be orders flying in from QC Cool
Wish to meet you some day.

Hugs from Val Morin
If you have the book, you can check out this lively and joyous family in this video made last year (in French, but you hardly need to know the language to get what’s going on with them). 

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6 donkeys, 2 ponies, 3 horses, and a llama in BC

Hello!

As you can see we have a sweet little collection of your books going.  In the back of Small Homes, Lloyd mentions what would be the next book.  All of them sound great, but BARNS would be what we would like to see.  We have 6 donkeys, 2 ponies, 3 horses, and a llama and I would like nothing better than to live in a barn with them and have my art studio!  So our vote goes to writing a book on BARNS!  We also have a 1200 acre woodlot with old growth Doug fir, a Woodmizer sawmill, a Nile kiln, and a Logosol planer, so we could make a marvelous barn with some great ideas coming from a BARN book of yours! 

Howard and Beatrix Linde

Williams Lake, BC

Canada

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A Phenomenal Bread Knife

All our bread is homemade, so we use a bread knife daily. We’ve had 3 of them, of different configurations. But we got this very unusual one a couple of months ago, and it’s not only better then any bread knife I’ve ever seen, but a delight to use.

Irene says: “I like making bread knives. I tell folks when they buy ’em, ‘If this doesn’t cut the bread SMACK out of the oven better then anything else you’ve ever used, then I’ll double your money back.’ No one’s ever returned a bread knife.”

The wood is cherry or mahogany, they are made in the USA, and available for $30 plus $10 postage (mail check) to:

Irene Tukuafu
2639 N. Sycamore Haven Dr. 
Nauvoo, Illinois
62354
Check out also, Irene’s musical instruments:
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SMALL HOMES Now Available

Our new book Small Homes: The Right Size is now available at independent bookstores, and Amazon — as well as from us: www.shelterpub.com/building/small-homes

Shameless Commerce Dept. This is, I think, the best building book we’ve ever done. (Yes, I’m sure I’ve said this before, but it keeps reoccurring to me.)  Shelter is everyone’s favorite; it captured the times, it inspired thousands of homes. Builders of the Pacific Coast is in some ways, my best book. It’s an odyssey of discovery where the reader rides shotgun with me over a 2-year period. Cohesive and focused.

BUT Small Homes is so useful to so many people in this era of astronomical home prices and rents, that I think it’s hugely important. It offers alternatives to people looking for rentals on Craigslist or homes on Zillow. Here are 65 very different homes, of different materials, in different parts of the world. The idea, as with all our building books is to use your hands to create your own shelter.

Two things I’ve discovered about this book (after seeing the finished product):

  1. There are a lot of homes out in middle America – Minnesota, Indiana, Missouri, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, more so than in any of our other books.
  2. It sparkles. Largely due to Rick’s considerable Photoshop skills, a motley assortment of photos from contributors have been rendered in colorful detail. I was stunned when I saw the first book off the press. The photos draw you in.
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For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of World War II

“The Lykovs lived in this hand-built log cabin, lit by a single window “the size of a backpack pocket” and warmed by a smoky wood-fired stove.” 

“As the intruders scrambled up the mountain, heading for the spot pinpointed by their pilots, they began to come across signs of human activity: a rough path, a staff, a log laid across a stream, and finally a small shed filled with birch-bark containers of cut-up dried potatoes. Then, Pismenskaya said:

Beside a stream there was a dwelling. Blackened by time and rain, the hut was piled up on all sides with taiga rubbish—bark, poles, planks. If it hadn’t been for a window the size of my backpack pocket, it would have been hard to believe that people lived there. But they did, no doubt about it…. Our arrival had been noticed, as we could see.

The low door creaked, and the figure of a very old man emerged into the light of day, straight out of a fairy tale. Barefoot. Wearing a patched and repatched shirt made of sacking. He wore trousers of the same material, also in patches, and had an uncombed beard. His hair was disheveled. He looked frightened and was very attentive…. We had to say something, so I began: ‘Greetings, grandfather! We’ve come to visit!’

The old man did not reply immediately…. Finally, we heard a soft, uncertain voice: ‘Well, since you have traveled this far, you might as well come in.’”

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/for-40-years-this-russian-family-was-cut-off-from-all-human-contact-unaware-of-world-war-ii-7354256/?utm_source=keywee-facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=keywee&kwp_0=277985&kwp_4=1099726&kwp_1=510127

From Rick Gordon

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