gardening (201)

The man who grows fields full of tables and chairs

“At first glance it is a typical countryside scene. Deep in the Derbyshire Dales, young willow trees stretch upwards towards the late spring sun. Birds, bees and the odd wasp provide a gentle soundtrack to the bucolic harmony.

But laid out in neat rows in the middle of a field are what appears to be a rather peculiar crop.

On closer inspection these are actually upside-down chairs, fully rooted in the sandy soil.

Slender willows sprout out of the ground then after a few inches the trunk becomes the back of a chair, the seat follows and finally the legs. The structure is tied to a blue frame and the entire form is clothed in leaves.…”

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-32977012

Sent by Jonathan Greene

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Family makes last-ditch appeal to save Welsh 'hobbit house' from demolition

Dear Mr Kahn,

This house is going to be bulldozed because it “does not fit in with the surrounding Pembrokeshire countryside” which has to be the most ridiculous reason there is.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/19/family-makes-last-ditch-appeal-to-save-welsh-hobbit-house-from-demolition

If you had the time to say a word or raise your hand in their favor it might help.  I live in the west of Ireland. I don’t know the people at all and have no interest in the matter other than that I feel their pain and if they lived somewhere else they would have gotten away with it.

Thank you for your time,

best regards,

Conor

https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/society/video/2015/may/19/see-inside-welsh-hobbit-house-risking-demolition-video

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New Video of Our Homestead by Kirsten Dirksen, Fair Companies

Kirsten Dirksen is a filmmaker with Fair Companies, a bi-lingual media operation that she and her husband Nicolás Boullosa run out of Barcelona. Kirsten is a former TV producer for MTV and the Travel Channel who now focusses on “…community and access to tools on sustainable culture.”

She has produced almost 600 videos, an amazing body of work when you consider that it’s the editing, not the shooting, that is so time-consuming. I don’t know how she does it.

We’ve had a bunch of people shoot film (OK, OK, video) around here and they generally take a long time to get set up, then follow a pre-conceived series of shots and questions.

Kirsten walked in the first time and within 5 minutes, was shooting. We were comfortable with her. She winged it, seeing what we were doing, following us around. On one of her visits, her two little long-haired girls explored the garden and chickens and Nicolás shot photos.

One thing I love about this video is that she recognized what Lesley is doing in her life and with her garden, her art, and her attitude towards a home. Often that gets missed in people coming here to see me.

The last part of this cracked me up.

Kirsten posted it earlier today.

https://faircompanies.com/videos/view/lloyd-kahn-on-his-norcal-self-reliant-half-acre-homestead/


Check through the other films at Fair Companies.


Photo of Kirsten by Nicolás Boullosa 

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Monsanto's Herbicide Roundup (…probably causes cancer in humans." Duh!

From todays New York Times, Op-Ed by Mark Bittman titled “Stop Making Us Guinea Pigs”

“The issues surrounding G.M.O.s — genetically modified organisms — have never been simple. They became more complicated last week when the International Agency for Research on Cancer declared that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the widely used herbicide Roundup, probably causes cancer in humans. Two insecticides, malathion and diazinon, were also classified as “probable” carcinogens by the agency, a respected arm of the World Health Organization…

…Nor is it surprising that it took so long — Roundup has been used since the 1970s — to discover its likely carcinogenic properties. There is a sad history of us acting as guinea pigs for the novel chemicals that industry develops. For this we have all too often paid with our damaged health.

Rarely is that damage instantaneous, but it’s safe to say that novel biotechnologies broadly deployed may well have unexpected consequences. Yet unlike Europeans, Canadians, Australians and others, we don’t subscribe to the precautionary principle, which maintains that it’s better to prevent damage than repair it.

We ask not whether a given chemical might cause cancer but whether we’re certain that it does.…”

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/25/opinion/stop-making-us-guinea-pigs.html

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