gardening (201)

Sleek Angle On a Community Garden Shed

“I don’t know about you, but when I hear the words “garden shed,” I don’t immediately picture a gorgeous, sleek and impossibly well-designed structure.So I thought it was pretty great that for the Woodlands Community Garden Club in Vancouver, Brendan Collander Design and UBC architecture students so excellently thought “outside the shed” when designing this multifaceted and very attractive structure…”

Click here.

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Hong Kong’s Guerrilla Gardeners

“…’We call him the Mango King because he loves mangoes so much,’ Leung says after we dodge an oncoming taxi. The Mango King is one of a growing number of urban farmers in Hong Kong, maximizing the city’s tight spaces to produce his own food. He currently grows sweet potatoes, 45 papaya trees, five mango trees, three banana trees, and two lychee trees on 700 square feet of land.

Hong Kong is one of the world’s most densely populated cities, famous for its skyscraper canyons and gritty, neon-lit streets. But most of its 1,100-square-kilometer territory is actually undeveloped—country parks alone account for more than half of the city’s land area. Instead of fostering a close connection between city-dwellers and nature, though, the opposite has happened: Hong Kong today is a city largely devoid of greenery, despite being surrounded by a spectacular procession of green mountains and craggy shorelines.…”

From Slate, click here.

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Straw Bale Gardening

Sometimes I post really good comments because I don’t think many people read comments on older posts:

“Anonymous has left a new comment on your post “Straw Bale Gardening”:

well, it is getting time to think of garden stuff. thought someone might find this interesting..

https://www.urbangardensweb.com/2013/07/11/french-straw-bale-garden-grows-crops-and-flowers-on-urban-balcony/

https://www.rootsimple.com/category/gardening/vegetable-gardening/page/4

https://www.rootsimple.com/2013/04/lady-urine-water-conservation-and-halfway-humanure/

https://www /.rootsimple.com/2013/04/a-straw-bale-urinal/ 

https://e3liveblog.com/2013/08/09/straw-bale-gardening-grow-a-garden-almost-anywhere/https://happyhouseandgarden.com/categories/15210/strawbale-gardening-instructionshttps://littlegardenspace.blogspot.ca/2014/02/how-to-grow-fresh-onions-year-round.html

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Great Food & Company at Bibi's Restaurant, Monroe, NC

I got to the restaurant just after closing time Monday night, but Jason, the owner, asked if I’d like a burger. He made me a great burger with melted cheese and a cornbread salad. Katie, the waitress, and Jason sat with me while I ate and we talked about organic food and farming and homesteading. Katie has two kids and she and her husband want to find a place in the country and plow the land with mules, be off the grid, and raise their own food. I told her she sounded just like a hippie girl from the 60s. Jason gets local food for his restaurant and prepares vegetarian and vegan meals as well as burgers and chicken. He’s the one who turned me on to the Palace restaurant, where I had breakfast the next morning. Here’s Jason’s Facebook page.

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A Homesteader's Philosophical Dilemma

“Interesting article:

‘I wanted to physically make the world a better place,’ Janes said. With his family’s help, he bought 40 acres of forested land on Denman Island. It came with two trailers. Janes and a girlfriend he’s no longer with moved into one, and promptly sold the other — ‘a big, ugly, white vinyl doublewide,’ he said. They planted a vegetable garden and got some chickens. Self-sufficiency ‘was definitely an ideal,’ Janes explained, ‘but we were doing everything we could’ to achieve it.

-Mike W”

Click here.

I realized in the ”60s and 70s that self-sufficiency is a DIRECTION. You never will get there, even remotely. In those years we were raising a lot of our own food, and when I planted some wheat and went through all the steps to get it from the field to flour for bread (unlike potatoes or corn, which you eat just the way it comes out of the ground), I saw that self sufficiency is a myth. BUT that’s no reason to give up. The idea is to become as self-sufficient as possible. AND, we weren’t really doing it to make the world a better place. We did it because whatever we could produce was better and cheaper and more tuned in than what we could buy.  Like building one’s own house. AND in doing that, it turns out that it IS better for the world.

-LK

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