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Interior of Recreated Barn at Building Museum

This is one of the buildings in a recreated 1700s township at the Highland Folk Museum in Newtonmore, Scotland. It started to rain just as we got there, but then the rain stopped. We spent about 2 hours there; I shot a LOT of photos.

The wattle walls facilitated drying of barley and oats. Opposing barn doors took advantage of cross drafts to winnow (separate chaff from) grain.

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185-foot tall Tower Built by Anchorage Lawyer

“Anchorage attorney Phil Weidner calls his structure ‘The Goose Creek Tower,’ because it sits near the confluence of Goose Creek and the Big Susitna River. He got the idea for the tower almost two decades ago and started construction in the late-90s.

Weidner says he took a break from the project that lasted 15 years but is ready to start again. ‘It’s meant to be a home, also an observatory,’ Weidner said. ‘I plan to eventually put a telescope in the top of it. Also, probably a ham radio station and call it Radio Free Goose Creek, and broadcast appropriate information to the world.’

The tower is 185 feet high with unfinished metal decks that wrap around almost every story. It’s natural wood and more than 60,000 pounds of steel.

Weidner says the major construction is finished, including electrical and plumbing, but interior work is still needed. He figures it could be another three years before it’s completed…”

Story by Lauren Maxwell/Photojournalist John Thain

https://www.ktva.com/weird-alaska-houses-part-3-dr-seuss-house-841/

Great Vimeo recently posted: https://www.neatorama.com/2016/04/09/Welcome-To-Goose-Creek-Tower/

Sent us by Jon Kalish

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Fine Old Homes Being Shipped on Barges From Canada to US

Anonymous has left a new comment on your post “Fine Tiny Home“:
I am glad these homes are being loved and used instead of trashed.
I am glad these folks will have a home.
Still and all
It seems bizarre to me…
Venerable B.C. homes shipped by barge to U.S. and offered as cheap housing:
The community is losing its old country charm, its heart and soul. Many of them are shipped south to Washington state, where people appreciate their hand-nailed craftsmanship and character. Oak Bay’s early 20th-century dwellings are being floated on barges to San Juan Island, where they’re offered to folks stuck in affordable housing jams.
A local charity, the San Juan Community Home Trust, is happy to take the aged Oak Bay beauties. Since making a “little field trip” to the district in 2014 and finding a treasure trove, trust officials have snatched a few Oak Bay abodes. It plans to take five more this year:
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My Photo Exhibit of Driftwood Architecture Opening This Weekend

I’m doing my first ever photo exhibit, opening this Saturday at the Bolinas Museum. It’s part of a 2-month-long exhibit on the subject of makeshift architecture, and features artists Jay Nelson, Whiting Tennis, and Eirik Johnson, along with my photos of driftwood beach shacks along the northern California coast.

Rick Gordon has processed and printed 24 14 by 18″ prints and printed them here on our new Epson Stylus Pro 4900 ink jet printer. They look pretty darn good! The ingenuity of anonymous beachcomber artists.

The opening is this Saturday, April 2nd. At 2PM, I’ll talk a bit about my background and our 46 years of publishing books on building and fitness; at 3PM, there’s a reception.

Bolinas Museum

48 Wharf Road

Bolinas, California  94924

https://www.bolinasmuseum.org

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