builders (144)

Foster Huntington's Treehouse (#4)

I’m just starting to work my next book, Small Homes, and still swamped catching up with all the notes I made to my recent trips to NYC and Oregon. My problem right now is too much “content.”

An example is Foster Huntington’s quite incredible compound built on a knoll in the Columbia River Gorge, about 45 minutes northeast of Portland. I wish I had time to do a feature article on this treehouse/skate park/hot tub complex that has a 360° view, which includes the (white) tip of Mount Hood and the Multnomah Falls (500+ feet tall)—I’ll get around to it eventually.

In coming days I’ll put up photos from my visit with Foster. If you’re interested, here are a couple of links to Foster’s latest projects, a film on Vimeo chronicling the months of treehouse construction, as well as his KickStarter campaign for a book on the same subject, which has already generated (ulp!) $58,000 (his goal was $30,0000).

https://vimeo.com/129335481

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/fosterhuntington/the-cinder-cone-build-book

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Tiny Home Builder and Tree Surgeon Coming to US From UK

Craftsperson Willow De La Roche was featured in Tiny Homes on the Move. She built Willow’s Wagon in 2011, and has a new company, Artisan Homes UK, that builds alternative small living spaces, such as gypsy caravans, shepherds wagons, tree houses, boat conversions, as well as earth-bag and cob houses.

Dear Lloyd,

I’m still living in my beautiful wagon thankfully the sheep have gone from my field now, as they uses to cram in under the wagon and make the most disconcerting and sudden noises in the middle of the night, not to mention reeking havoc with my log pile. But this morning the snow lies all around but i’m really nice and cozy inside. 🙂

Read More …

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Eliphante: Michael Kahn’s Sculptural Village in the Arizona Desert

In 1989, I drove my Tacoma truck to Arizona to visit my cousin Mike, who had created a sculptural complex in the desert near Sedona. Mike and I had hung out together as kids; he was a year younger, and we looked a lot alike. He was an artist from early on. We’d each gone off with our different lives, then got together in the mid-60s when we were both feeling the stirrings of the cultural revolution, and this was the first time I’d seen him since then.

He told me he’d been influenced and inspired by our book Shelter in building what he called Eliphante. I stayed there for a few days, visiting Mike and his wife Leda and shot the pictures that appear in our book Home Work, and here on our blog: https://www.theshelterblog.com/eliphante-michael-kahns-sculptural-village-arizona-desert/#wrapper.
He created the room shown here out of used automobile windshields, with stained glass glued on with silicone caulk.
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The Shelter Blog (theshelterblog.com) is Alive!

Rick Gordon has built it and we’ve been tinkering with it for a few months, and finally it feels ready to go. Whereas my blog is all over the place, The Shelter Blog will focus on homes, building, carpentry, gardening, farming, foraging, fishing, homesteading and the home arts. Check it out here:

https://www.theshelterblog.com

Note: it’s theshelterblog.com, not shelterblog.com. You need the article the.

I’m really excited by this. It’s as important — maybe in the long run more so — than one of our books. We have no competition here, since we have feedback from our 40 years publishing books on the subject of shelter. Plus we can share brand-new incoming photos and stories rather than wait years to get same into a book. It’ll be complimentary to our books.

We guarantee at least one new post per day, hope to get multiple posts daily as we get rolling.

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